What to see at Edinburgh Art Festival 2017

What do see at Edinburgh Art Festival 2017

Photo: Ruth Clark

Featuring photography, pageantry, plants and pizza, an abundance of artists, ideas and venues make for yet another exciting EAF programme

The Edinburgh Art Festival is an annual celebration of visual art in all its forms, bringing a range of work to the city throughout the end of July and August. From group exhibitions to public solo performances, this year's festival is packed with innovative and interesting events and exhibitions to explore. To help you decide what to catch, we've rounded up our highlights from the programme.

Plant Scenery of the World
Celebrating a half century of the Royal Botanic Gardens' glasshouses, this mix of existing and freshly commissioned work will evoke the dramatic and naturalistic displays of plants under glass.
Plant Scenery of the World, Inverleith House, Inverleith Row, 28 Jul–29 Oct, Tue–Fri, 11am–5.30pm, Sat & Sun, 10am–5.30pm.

Toby Paterson
This is one of several EAF pieces which link back to urban planner Patrick Geddes' influence, with Paterson pursuing his love of the built environment.
Toby Paterson, Chessels Court, Canongate, 27 Jul–27 Aug, 10am–6pm.

Bobby Niven
A founder of the Bothy Project, Niven's festival work also takes the ideas of Geddes as the starting point to create a temporary studio for production, conversation, plant-growing and cooking pizza in a mud oven.
Bobby Niven, Johnston Terrace Wildlife Garden, Castle Wynd South, 27 Jul–27 Aug, 10am–6pm.

Jacob Kerray
Glasgow's Kerray explores his interest in pro wrestling, football and historical painting in works he himself has dubbed 'revisions of redundant fantasies aiming not to reassert heroism, but to present ideology with a sense of dilapidated lameness.'
Jacob Kerray, Talbot Rice Gallery, South Bridge, 28 Jul–30 Sep, Mon–Fri, 10am–5pm, Sat & Sun, noon–5pm.

Wendy McMurdo
Exactly how much does being constantly in front of a screen affect our children? Edinburgh-born photographer Wendy McMurdo documents the often contentious relationship between kids and their computers.
Wendy McMurdo, Museum of Childhood, High Street, 0131 529 4142, 27 Jul–4 Sep, Mon, Thu–Sat, 10am–5pm, Sun noon–5pm.

Constable and McTaggart
A pair of 19th century landscape paintings by John Constable and William McTaggart come into sharp contrast here for A Meeting of Two Masterpieces.
Constable and McTaggart, Scottish National Gallery, The Mound, until 25 Mar, 10am–5pm, Thu until 7pm (Jul, Sep–Mar), 10am–6pm, Thu until 7pm (Aug).

Shadows of War
Roger Fenton's 1855 photographs of the Crimean War capture the solitude of that conflict's troops and a ghostly emptiness of the battlefields once war has subsided.
Shadows of War, The Queen's Gallery, Royal Mile, 4 Aug–26 Nov, 9.30am–6pm.

Zoe Walker & Neil Bromwich
Portraying utopian fantasies that many people would love to see reach fruition one day, Zoe Walker and Neil Bromwich's work (such as their 2005 'Love Cannon', above) captures pageantry, participation and public performances that aim to project a better, perhaps kinder future.
Zoe Walker & Neil Bromwich, Trinity Apse, High Street, 27 Jul–27 Aug, 10am–6pm.

Jac Leirner
How the mundane can somehow become beautiful and poetic is at the heart of Brazilian-born Jac Leirner's sculptural work. Her first solo show in Scotland (Add it Up) zooms in on everyday objects such as cigarette papers, spirit levels and lightbulbs.
Jac Leirner, Fruitmarket Gallery, Market Street, until 22 Oct, Mon–Sat, 11am–6pm, Sun 11am–5pm (Jul, Sep & Oct), Mon–Sun, 10am–7pm (Aug).

Daughters of Penelope
Christine Borland, Hanna Tuulikki, Erin Riley, Elizabeth Blackadder, Aino Kajeniemi and Claire Barclay are among the artists represented here in an exhibition which investigates the Dovecot Gallery's past as well as poring over stories about women and textiles.
Daughters of Penelope, Dovecot Gallery, Infirmary Street, 20 Jul–20 Jan, Mon–Sat, 10.30am–5.30pm (Jul, Sep–Jan), Mon–Sun, 10am–6pm (Aug).

All events on every day and free unless stated.

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