Erin McGathy: Love You Loudly (2 stars)

A repetitive and irritating musing on one person's disastrous love life

comments (1)
Erin McGathy: Love You Loudly

credit: Robyn Von Swank

While there's little doubt that Erin McGathy has experienced a tough time in the love stakes, it's more difficult to concede that she's come anywhere near creating a Fringe show that makes you care a whole lot. She may have our sympathy in gently batting away the unwanted interruptions of a disappointingly drunk elderly Scot, but even if this blunts her hour's final section, it's fairly clear by then that Love You Loudly is not the sharpest knife in the Fringe comedy drawer.

With sections informally marked by the repetitive phrase 'and then after that, I went out with … ', you feel as though you're looking over a teenage girl's shoulder and reading the least insightful or interesting entries in her diary. Everyone she hooks up with is either a 'ding dong or weirdo', and she recalls a fight she had with a boyfriend during their podcast as though it's the most relatable thing in the world. And she leaves phrase like 'I then had the opportunity to volunteer on a farm in Ireland' hanging in the air with no awareness that it might be worthy of some context.

At this Fringe, much potent comedy has been cultivated from pain and despair, but Erin McGathy's contribution will only irritate and bore.

Gilded Balloon at the Counting House, until 29 Aug, 2pm, £5 or Pay What You Want.

Erin McGathy: Love You Loudly

  • 2 stars

Erin McGathy Erin McGathy (This Feels Terrible, Drunk History, Community) presents a comedy show about love, guts, despair and wearing wedding dresses covered in candy for approval. Buy a ticket in advance to guarantee entry or Pay What You Want at the venue Age category: 16+


1. Patrick O'Reilly18 Aug 2016, 9:31pm Report

I saw the show yesterday and thought it was really charming and funny.

Erin tells her story in a very honest and vulnerable way. The audience is given a glimpse into the fantasy, angst and passion that preoccupies the mind of a young woman as she matures from childhood, through adolescence and into becoming an adult.

Anyone who has been lucky enough to experience love will instantly relate to the narrative.

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