Pleasance, Underbelly, Gilded Balloon and Assembly launch programme for Fringe 2015

This year will see Underbelly move to George Square and launch a new Circus Hub


This article is from 2015.

Pleasance, Underbelly, Gilded Balloon and Assembly launch programme for Fringe 2015

The Udderbelly will be moving from Bristo Square to George Square for 2015 and 2016

Their events might be up and for sale online already, but today marks the official launch for the Fringe’s ‘big four’ venues: Assembly, Gilded Balloon, Pleasance and Underbelly.

There are two big bits of venue news for the Underbelly. The Udderbelly, the venue’s giant, upside-down purple cow, moves to George Square for 2015 and 2016 due to the refurbishment of University of Edinburgh buildings in its traditional Bristo Square home. And the Underbelly add a brand new venue to its empire in the form of Circus Hub, two spaces on the Meadows that will showcase circus shows from the Czech Republic, Australia, Belgium, Palestine and the UK.

In response to the cancellation of last year’s The City, part-funded by the Israeli government, as well as events at London’s Barbican and Tricycle Theatre, the Underbelly presents Walking the Tightrope, a series of short political plays exploring freedom of expression by writers including Caryl Churchill, Neil LaBute, Mark Ravenhill and Timberlake Wertenbaker.

Daily Show-bound Trevor Noah heads up Assembly’s comedy line-up, which also includes Adam Hills, Marcus Brigstocke, Mark Steel and Sarah Kendall. Assembly also expands its venues to include Murrayfield Ice Rink for the ‘immersive dance-skating experience’ Vertical Influences from Quebecois dance group Le Patin Libre, and a Korean season includes a 5000-year-old séance art-form and contemporary dance.

Among the Pleasance’s 237 shows, John Hannah stars in The Titanic Orchestra as a man claiming to be Houdini, Phill Jupitus stars as Arthur Conan-Doyle in the play Impossible, and there are the latest pieces from Philip Ridley (Tonight with Donny Stixx) and Jack Thorne (The Solid Life of Sugar Water). Reginald D Hunter, Jo Lycett, Felicity Ward and The Pin are among the Pleasance’s huge comedy offering.

Over at the Gilded Balloon, Alan Davies, Jo Brand, Tommy Tiernan and Mark Nelson head the comedy line-up, and Miles Allen promises to condense 60 shows into 60 minutes in One Man Breaking Bad.

The complete Fringe 2015 programme across all venues is announced on Thursday 4 June. See for full listings.

Get ready for the Edinburgh Festival Fringe!

This article is from 2015.

The Titanic Orchestra

  • 3 stars

Sarah Stribley Productions in association with AHP and the Pleasance John Hannah (Four Weddings and a Funeral, Sliding Doors, The Mummy) stars in this madcap comedy of illusion. Four tramps huddle together at an abandoned railway station, full of vodka-fuelled dreams of escaping on one of the passing trains. But the…

One Man Breaking Bad: The Unauthorized Parody

Miles Allen Sixty episodes. Sixty minutes. One show. Yo! Join us on a rip-roaring ride through the greatest television show ever made. LA actor Miles Allen smacks the senses with his super-charged, crazily accurate renditions of all the iconic characters, including Walter White, Jesse, Saul, Skyler, Hank, Walt Junior…

Vertical Influences

  • 5 stars

Double-bill of movement, wit, speed and grace. Presented by contemporary ice-skaters Le Patin Libre.


The Spontaneity Shop Seances, spirituality, immortality and magic. The true story of the deadly feud between Harry Houdini and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Starring Phill Jupitus as Conan Doyle and Alan Cox as Houdini. By Robert Khan and Tom Salinsky, writers of previous Edinburgh smash hits Coalition: 'real class… don't…

Walking the Tightrope: The Tension Between Art and Politics

  • 4 stars

Offstage and Underbelly Productions, in association with Theatre Uncut World premiere of explosive political short plays by writers including Caryl Churchill, Neil LaBute and Timberlake Wertenbaker, followed by energetic post-show audience discussions with stellar panels exploring freedom of expression in the UK arts…


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