John Ruskin: Artist and Observer (2 stars)

An all too comprehensive overview of Ruskin’s artistic practice shows him to be less than outstanding

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This article is from 2014.

*4 John Ruskin: Artist and Observer

Picture courtesy of Abbot Hall Art Gallery, Lakeland Arts Trust, Kendal, Cumbria, UK

John Ruskin: Artist and Observer at first appears to be an unassuming display of watercolours, sketches and photos, appealing only to enthusiasts for either the media or the natural or architectural subjects that form its visual content. Yet by the time this presentation of Ruskin’s works has been viewed in its entirety, the revered art critic has been knocked off his pedestal.

Beyond the Portrait Gallery’s confusing navigational sequence (an uneasy combination of chronological and thematic sections), the material itself raises perplexing questions about the nature of observing and recording. Ruskin’s skill as a delineator of nature is evident, while the architectural studies reveal his passion for the topics of his critical writings.
Yet sporadically present in the works are a number of studies after paintings he admired. Here, Ruskin’s observational hand strips the originals of their vivacity, rendering the evocative clouds of Turner to diagrammatic wisps.

His own observations, like the absorbing ‘Vineyard Walk, Lucca,’ reveal that Ruskin’s was not just a scientific hand. Yet among an oeuvre that largely functioned as a means of observing the world, his lifeless recreations of artistic works cast a dull shadow over the rest of the exhibition, threatening to eclipse his more emotive, subtler impressions.

Scottish National Portrait Gallery, 624 6200, until Sun 28 Sep, £8 (£6).

This article is from 2014.

John Ruskin: Artist and Observer

  • 2 stars

Drawings and paintings by the Victorian art critic and writer John Ruskin, who famously championed Turner and condemned Whistler. Ruskin was a skilled draughtsman and watercolourist whose pictures illustrate many of his own books, and this show gathers together some of his finest work. The exhibition is a collaboration…

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