Talks around 'Culture and Conflict' highlight the WWI focus of Edinburgh International Festival 2014

Topics include women's roles in wartime, soft power, pacifism and anti-war activism

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This article is from 2014.

Talks around 'Culture and Conflict' highlight the WWI focus of Edinburgh International Festival 2014

Emmanuel Jal

It may have come in for some knocks last year when it was announced that 2014’s Edinburgh International Festival wouldn’t be touching upon certain timely political subjects, but in the ancillary programme which accompanies the high-end performance works, reflection upon the impact of World War I – an overriding theme of many of this year’s shows – hasn’t shied away from the contemporary.

There are too many individual discussions to go into detail, but perhaps a rough ‘historical’ chronology might help put things into perspective. With The War That Ended Peace (9 Aug), Professor Margaret McMillan reflects upon the beginning of the war and of its impact upon Europe, while in First World War: Re-thinking the Centenary (9 Aug) Professor John Horne asks how our continued commemoration might be carried out. In The Peace to End Peace (27 Aug), the geo-political fallout of 1914–1918 is also explored.

Broader topics also appear, including the idea of pacifism in Objecting to War (12 Aug), Scotland’s tradition of anti-war activism in From Red Clydeside to Radical Scotland (18 Aug), collateral damage in Killing Civilians (26 Aug) and the role of women in 20th century conflicts in Women in the Killing Fields: Femininity and War (19 Aug). Amid a wealth of other intriguing topics, Emmanuel Jal joins Brett Bailey and Dr. Tarak Barkawi to discuss how was destroys truths and lives in War, Atrocities and the Truth (20 Aug) and the relationship between art and international politics relative to Scotland is also examined in Scotland in the Soft Power Era (28 Aug).

The Hub, 9–28 Aug (not 15–17, 23–25), times vary, each event £6.

This article is from 2014.

Scotland in the Soft Power Era

Discussion featuring Professor Chris Breward, Vice Principal Creative Industries and Performing Arts, Professor Antonella Sorace, Professor of Developmental Linguistics and Professor John Holden, cultural relations expert.

First World War: Re-thinking the Centenary

Discussion looking at the First World War for what it was. chaired by Professor Donald Bloxham, University of Edinburgh.

From Red Clydeside to Radical Scotland

A look at anti-war activity in Scotland.

The Peace to End Peace

What lessons were learnt at the end of the First World War?

Killing Civilians

A look at the human suffering of those not directly involved in the conflict.

Objecting to War

Chaired by Sir Adam Roberts, Professor Martin Ceadel looks at those who opposed the war.

The War that Ended Peace

Professor Margaret MacMillan discusses the effects that entering into the First World War had on the European continent's stance in the world.

Culture and Conflict

A look at how war influenced culture with Robyn Marsack, Director of the Scottish Poetry Library and theatre academic Octavian Saiu.

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