Edinburgh Art Festival 2014: 10 must-see exhibitions

Featuring Augusto Corrieri & Vincent Gambini, Dalziel + Scullion and Isa Genzken


This article is from 2014.

Art Fest Highlights

Featuring the work of artists such as Alison Watt, Dalziel + Scullion, Isa Genzken and the American impressionists, we pick out the exhibitions that should be on your wishlist

Augusto Corrieri and Vincent Gambini

Could Augusto Corrieri be a fan of the Marx Brothers movie Duck Soup, with its famous mirror scene? After all, his video work, ‘Diorama’, features a human and a sheep copying each other’s actions over the course of seven minutes. And Vincent Gambini might well be the Derren Brown of the Edinburgh Art Festival what with his interest in magic and misdirection.
Rhubaba, Arthur Street, 1–31 Aug, Fri–Sun, noon–5pm.

FAILE & Båst

If you have an ambition to expand the appeal of art, what better way to attempt it than by gathering up some arcade games and inviting visitors to play on them. Street artist Båst and the FAILE duo of Patrick McNeil and Patrick Miller do just that as they blur the line between high and low art.
Summerhall, 0131 560 1590, 1–31 Aug, 11am–9pm; 1–26 Sep, 11am–6pm.

Dalziel + Scullion: Tumadh – Immersion

Even 17 years on, only the coldest of hearts wouldn’t have a little smile to themselves when they pass The Horn on the M8. For their 2014 show, Dundee-based Dalziel + Scullion are digging deep and immersing themselves (and the watcher) into their natural environment with works such as ‘Hair’ and ‘Horse’.
Dovecot Studios, Infirmary Street, 0131 550 3660, 1–31 Aug, 10.30am–6.30pm; 1–13 Sep, Mon–Sat, 10.30am–5.30pm.

Isa Genzken

The German artist gives her first UK exhibition outside of London and shows why her fusion of photography, paint, architecture and found objects into the realm of sculpture has been so influential to generations of younger artists.
Inverleith House, Inverleith Row, 0131 248 2849, 19 Jul–28 Sep, Tue–Sun, 10am–5.30pm.

Poetry from the Palace: Poets Laureate from Dryden to Duffy

With Carol Ann Duffy at the halfway point of her tenure as Poet Laureate, perhaps speculation will begin on who might be next in line. But for now, this exhibition explores the post with images of Dryden, Wordsworth and Betjeman among others.
The Queen’s Gallery, Royal Mile, 0131 556 5100, 7 Aug–2 Nov, 9.30am–6pm, £6.50 (£3.25–£5.90; under 5s free, family ticket £16.25).


Featuring work from artists such as Michelle Hannah, Alec Finlay and Ross Birrell, this exhibition seeks to broaden critical thinking about visual art. And once the festival is over, a forum will convene in the autumn to chew some fat over the issues.
Talbot Rice Gallery, South Bridge, 0131 650 2210, 1–31 Aug, Mon–Fri, 10am–5pm, Sat & Sun, noon–5pm; 1 Sep–18 Oct, Tue–Fri, 10am–5pm, Sat, noon–5pm.

Calum Colvin: The Magic Box

For his Magic Box mix of the old and the new, printmaking, ceramic works, mirror stereoscopes, anaglyphs, phantograms and other experimental works will feature. Alongside them will be new pieces of painting, construction and photography created by Colvin in residence over the summer.
Edinburgh Printmakers, Union Street, 0131 557 2479, 1 Aug–6 Sep, Tue–Sat, 10am–6pm.

Alison Watt: Still

A ten-year-old work commissioned for the Art Festival of 2004 by the Ingleby Gallery, Watt’s painting was influenced by her research into this church and its particular relationship between the living and the dead.
Old Saint Paul’s Episcopal Church, 39 Jeffrey Street, until 31 Dec, 8am–6pm.

The King's Peace: Realism and War
The concept of modern peace is explored in this group show which also features work from Adam Broomberg & Oliver Chanarin and Grupo de Artistas de Vanguardia. Each contributor assembles words and images in ways that question the illusion of reality which can seemingly be so easily achieved with the camera.
Stills, Cockburn Street, 0131 622 6200, 1 Aug–26 Oct, 11am–6pm.

American Impressionism: A New Vision
Dividing up some late 19th century American artists (such as Frank Weston Benson and Mary Cassatt) into four groups, A New Vision shows how those US creators tackled the cult of impressionism, a movement which seemed particularly entrenched in European art circles.
Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art, Belford Road, 0131 624 6200, 19 Jul–31 Aug, 10am–6pm; 1 Sep–19 Oct, 10am–5pm, £8 (£6).

All events on every day and free unless stated.

This article is from 2014.

Edinburgh Art Festival

Scotland’s largest annual celebration of visual art offers work by the best contemporary Scottish artists as well as exhibitions of the most important international artists and movements of the 20th century and other historical periods.


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