Holes by Tom Basden (3 stars)

New comedy that suffers from a crisis of identity


This article is from 2013.

Holes by Tom Basden

A plane crash, office politics and the fate of mankind are just three of the themes that litter Tom Basden’s Holes, a new comedy that maroons a bunch of misfits on a deserted island. But, while it begins as a comedy, it soon gives way to something much more sinister.

Created by the team behind 2009’s Fringe First winning Party, Holes throws together colleagues Gus (Mathew Baynton), Ian (Daniel Rigby), Marie (Katy Wix) and teenager Erin (Bebe Cave) as four very different survivors of a mysterious plane crash. But as they wait for rescue, a series of unfortunate events threaten their view of the world, and eventually, each other.

While Holes initially showcases Basden’s funny dialogue and Philip Breen’s direction, it slowly evolves and changes from comedy to tragedy, and then onto something much more disturbing. The problem with the play is that it seems to suffer from an identity crisis: is it a comedy? Is it a drama? There are many unanswered questions in Holes, which leads a promising piece of new writing to come to an unsatisfying and sudden conclusion.

Assembly George Square, 0131 623 3030, until Sun 25th Aug, 3pm, 6.30pm, £20.00 (£16.00).

This article is from 2013.

Holes by Tom Basden

  • 3 stars

The Invisible Dot Ltd. Three conference organisers and a teenage girl are the sole survivors of a fatal plane crash on a remote tropical island. With Daniel Rigby, Katy Wix, Mathew Baynton, and Bebe Cave. A world premiere from the Fringe First winning team behind 2009 smash, Party. Written by Tom Basden and directed by…


Post a comment