Mostly West: Franz West and Artist Collaborations (4 stars)

Fascinating show packed full of memorable collaborations

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This article is from 2013.

Mostly West: Franz West and Artist Collaborations

A tribute that wasn't meant to be, Mostly West was conceived in 2011, before the Austrian artist Franz West died last year. In its finished form it feels not so much like the high-concept 30-year retrospective which it is, as a fusillade of commemorations in the form of ideas. Rather than a eulogy or an inscription in a book, it's as if some of the most compelling modern artists of our time have chosen to pay their respects by allowing their legacies to intertwine with West's. Numerous works are memorable, including the simple Every, little made with Douglas Gordon, a pair of useable divan chairs under the comfort-deadening stencilled motto 'Every time you think of me, we die, a little', and the very amusing Essenz with Heimo Zobernig, ten white chairs assembled in prime position to view a plain white box. Spiegel in Kabine mit Passstucken is a conceptual minefield, four apparently for-use abstract clubs placed outside an enclosed white cube whose interior walls are plastered with the local paper. There's a room of fantastical abstract sculptures and wall decoration all created with Anselm Reyle and a simple, impenetrable bag of coal presented with a soft sheet of red fabric created alongside Jannis Kounellis, while the brilliant Talk Without Words (Marina Faust) and the amusing Bateau Imaginaire (also with Zobernig) provide further fascination in this wonderland of a show.

Inverleith House, 248 2971/2849, until 22 Sep, free

This article is from 2013.

Mostly West: Franz West and Artist Collaborations

  • 4 stars

The late Franz West was the opposite of artists who consider their works as icons to be contemplated. He made things for the viewer to pick up and touch, and he liked to collaborate with people. This major exhibition displays the range of his collaborations and the exuberant, public character of his art.

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