Kids Hitlist

Our pick of shows for the little festival goer to enjoy

comments (1)

This article is from 2009.

Room on the Broom

Our pick of shows for the little festival goer to enjoy. And maybe the big one too

Rapunzel and the Tower of Doom: The ever-wonderful Theatre of Widdershins returns to the Fringe for another helping of puppetry fun. An exquisite set and witty storytelling should make this one of the best kids shows in town. Scottish Storytelling Centre, 556 9579, 7-30 Aug (not 10, 17 & 24), 11am, £7.50 (£5).

Andy and Mike’s … Big Box of Bananas:
Andy Day of CBeebies, and his partner in comedy, Mikey take you on a seriously bonkers quest to find out what’s inside ‘the box’. Prepare for much in the way of silliness. Pleasance Courtyard, 556 6550, 9–23 Aug, 12.50pm, £8 (£6). Previews 7 & 8 Aug, 12.50pm, £6.

Room on the Broom:
Julia Donaldson’s picture book comes alive courtesy of the team who brought you The Gruffalo. Pleasance Courtyard, 556 6550, 8–31 Aug (not 12, 19 & 20), 2.30pm, £8.50–£9.80 (£7.50–£8.50). Previews until 7 Aug, £6.50.

Giraffes Can’t Dance: Blunderbus Theatre Company captivates adults and children alike with its beautiful puppets and lively storytelling. The Space @ Royal College of Surgeons, 0845 508 8515, 8–29 Aug (not 16), 10.35am (9 & 23, 2.35pm), £7 (£6). Preview 7 Aug, 10.35am, £5.

The Wind in the Willows:
Kenneth Grahame’s novel gets a fresh, humorous re-working in this colourful production. Gilded Balloon Teviot, 7–31 Aug (not 18), 12.30pm, £7–£9 (£5–£6). Previews until 6 Aug, 12.30pm, £5.

Patrick Monahan’s Stories and Fables for Kids that Like to Sit at Tables!:
Likeable comedian, Patrick Monahan dresses up as a 467-year-old Middle Eastern storyteller. Gilded Balloon Teviot, 622 6552, 9–30 Aug (not 17), 1.30pm, £7–£8 (£6–£7). Previews 7 & 8 Aug, 1.30pm, £5.

This article is from 2009.

Patrick Monahan's Stories and Fables for Kids that like to sit at Tables!

  • 4 stars

Stories told by 467-year-old storyteller from the Middle East who looks and sounds like comedian Patrick Monahan! For kids aged 5 to 105 years old.

Wind in the Willows

  • 4 stars

A sparky and imaginative reworking of the much-loved novel, crammed with silliness, wit and good-natured messing about. This show features 1930s lady weasels, an epic baguette duel, the majesty of the British countryside conveyed through mime, and undoubtedly the most glorious picnic ever staged. We all know the story…

Andy and Mike's … Big Box of Bananas

  • 4 stars

A mysterious, magical box appears, but to open it, CBeebies presenter Andy Day and comedy partner Michael James must take the journey of their life! Come and find out what's inside!

Room on the Broom

  • 5 stars

Following highly successful adaptations of Julia Donaldson’s The Gruffalo and The Gruffalo’s Child, Tall Stories presents another enchanting tale from this best-selling author set to charm and entertain audiences world-wide. Room on the Broom is brought to life with vibrant storytelling, charming puppetry and upbeat…

Giraffes Can't Dance

  • 4 stars

Gerald the giraffe was not a good dancer. Every year, he dreaded the great Jungle Dance. But one beautifulmoonlit night, Gerald discoversthat sometimes all we need is a different song to dance to!

Rapunzel and the Tower of Doom

  • 5 stars

Bad hair day? Pity Rapunzel: a mad witch climbing her locks every day. Ouch! Grimm tale returns to its dark roots. 'Very wonderful, beautiful puppets' - ***** (The List). 'Fantastic' - ***** (ThreeWeeks). Sell-out 2007/2008.


1. Observer Newspaper 9th August9 Aug 2009, 9:05pm5 stars Kids Hitlist Report

Cambridge's ADC Theatre rolled up with a standout Wind in the Willows (Gilded Balloon) which acknowledged that the original book manages the incredible feat of being both drippy and dry, and rewrote it. The hugely charismatic Toad (James Walker) is essentially Hugh Laurie's Prince Regent in Blackadder as dandy amphibian road hog, while the weasels are, in a masterstroke of oestro-fun, sexy slapstick flappers with a lisping desire to raid Toad's legendary Ham Cupboard.

Someone told me last night that Kenneth Grahame wrote the original to recover from the trauma of being held up at gunpoint. Can this be true? Whatever, the tale is endlessly reinventable, and done here with sunshine and fizz. Which, I suspect, will be the story of this festival: despite the woes about roads, and sponsorship, and Edinburgh's endless moans, as reinventable as those Willows. The programme is insanely strong, the weather heavenly, and I think we're set fair.

Post a comment
RSS feed of these comments