Martin Bell

Seeking truth and an end to sleaze

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This article is from 2008.

Martin Bell

Eleven years after New Labour’s landslide victory, Martin Bell has been considering Tony Blair’s legacy. More specifically, the white suit-wearing BBC war correspondent turned independent MP, and now UNICEF ambassador, wants to work out where it all went wrong. In town to discuss his book, The Truth that Sticks: New Labour’s Breach of Trust, Bell will be picking apart what he sees as ‘the most dazzling, disappointing and ultimately dangerous decade in modern politics.’ His straight-talking critique begins with what he believes were false promises made by Labour to ‘end sleaze’. Their irresistible claims won over the hearts of the British public, who by that point were fed up with ‘dodgy politics’ and a Tory government that had ‘lost its moral compass’.

This was Bell’s cue to step in, as a crusader for honesty and transparency, bumping Neil Hamilton off his seat in Westminster – into a shiny new showbiz career – and getting himself into the House of Commons, a perfect spot for sniffing out any further nonsense. His analysis of Labour’s decade of corruption, scandal and deceit, their doomed decision to go to war in Iraq, and their shameful neglect of the victims it created is passionate, damning and hard-hitting. Asking just how a government can recover from such abuse of power and loss of public trust, his whistle-blowing seems well-timed one year into the Brown era. Expect damning revelations and a call for politicians and policies that we deserve from this truth-seeking missile.

20 Aug, 6.30pm, £9 (£7).

This article is from 2008.

Martin Bell

The BBC war correspondent turned independent MP examines Tony Blair's legacy in his new book, 'The Truth that Sticks: New Labour' Breach of Trust'. 'Part of the Edinburgh International Book Festival'.

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