Lucy McCormick: Post Popular (4 stars)

Lucy McCormick: Post Popular

Musical mess from the queen of performance art

Thank goodness for Lucy McCormick. Without her, those of us who love a good song and dance routine, but don't want to feel dirty afterwards for bathing in the mainstream, would be lost. Fortunately, McCormick is willing to get dirty for us, in every possible way.

Following on from previous Fringe hit, Triple Threat, where she clambered inside the New Testament, McCormick is now looking at powerful women in history. Starting chronologically ('so the show makes some sort of sense') she goes right back to the Garden of Eden to embody Eve. Then ends with the beheading of Anne Boleyn via Celtic warrior Boudica and hospital hero Florence Nightingale (that's the chronology shot then).

We, the crowd, are here to serve as bit-parts in what is essentially the I Love Lucy show. But it's a role we're more than happy to play, whether it's the front row holding up bits of foliage in Eden, playing the army to her wild-eyed Boudica, or simply bolstering her wafer-thin ego.

For while (show) Lucy is a self-serving narcissist who treats her fabulous sidekicks like dirt, (real) Lucy is lovely and talented, so we'll forgive her anything. Especially when she and her dancers throw out a sharply synchronised routine, or McCormick's silky voice slips down the microphone in a power ballad. And the fact that she does it covered in mud, sweat and tomato ketchup makes her even more lovable.

Ultimately, McCormick is searching for a hero to inspire and motivate her, so she can then do the same for us. But when, upon opening, the box of Cadbury's Heroes she grabs is filled with empty wrappers, McCormick solves the problem with possibly the finest show ending I've ever seen.

Pleasance Courtyard, until 25 Aug (not 19), 8pm, £13–£14 (£11–£12).

Lucy McCormick: Post Popular

  • 4 stars

Soho Theatre, Johnson & Mackay and United Agents Following her genre-defying smash-hit, Triple Threat, Lucy McCormick is back to crawl through the annals of history in this enthusiastically humiliating exploration of power and purpose. Joined by friends with benefits, Samir Kennedy and Rhys Hollis, Lucy is back…

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