Paul Gravett

Fighting the anti-comics brigade

comments (1)

This article is from 2008.

Paul Gravett

Paul Gravett is an acknowledged expert on comics, who started off with comic-marts, before moving into publishing (with titles including Neil Gaiman and Dave McKean’s Violent Cases in the 80s) and writing hundreds of books, articles and columns on sequential art. The British comics landscape wouldn’t be the same without his input and passion for the medium. ‘Part of my interest isn’t just in comics, it’s in the people who create comics, the people who read comics and how the medium is – for some reason or another – under-appreciated or even despised in this country and how I think we should get a much better look-in as a cultural and creative expression.’

For his event, he’ll be joining publisher Emma Hayley and artist Robert Deas to discuss the new Manga reinterpretation of Macbeth. Japanese comics have become one of the biggest success stories in British publishing over recent years, with eye-popping art, a huge back catalogue of material ready to be translated and a fresh approach to the idea of who comics are for. In Japan, comics are read by the entire population, not just boys with superhero fixations, so there’s a boarder range of issues covered. Now artists and writers worldwide are adopting the Manga style.

‘A lot of it can be imitative but where it’s fresh and people make it part of their own culture, Manga is having a very positive effect to the point where some of the more interesting Manga isn’t actually coming out of Japan.’ Perhaps this is the perfect way to reinvigorate Shakespeare for a new generation.

14 Aug (with Robert Deas and Emma Hayley), 8.30pm, £9 (£7).

This article is from 2008.

Paul Gravett

The expert continues to fight the anti-comics brigade as he shares an event with publisher Emma Hayley and artist Robert Deas to discuss the new Manga interpretation of 'Macbeth'. 'Part of the Edinburgh International Book Festival'.

Comments

1. scotsdragon7 Aug 2008, 8:45am Report

Why, when we have such a fine tradition of comics and cartooning in this country, do we feel the need to import a style from elsewhere?
"some of the more interesting Manga isn’t actually coming out of Japan." Means what? They are using timeless classics of ours, messing about with the words, dropping them in some off- planet worlds - and that is 'more interesting'?? I really don't think so.
I'd rather see them converted into The Mysore School of Indian art. Now that WOULD be new and different!!

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