The Factory

Theatrical technology

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This article is from 2008.

The Factory

A questioning of human nature and love of technology has defined Bristol-based company Precarious in recent years. Both Junction 8 and Druthers explored aspects of ourselves we’d sometimes rather forget, and presented them in a cutting-edge fashion. Now the company is back at the Fringe with another uncompromising work, The Factory.

Fusing physical theatre and multimedia, the show takes a timely look at consumerism. ‘Now that people have to pick up the bill for years of endless spending,’ says director Dan Shorten, ‘it’s prompted us to ask what it is that’s missing in people’s lives that we try to fill with shoes, cars and nose jobs – what is it that we really want?’

With an Orwellian/Big Brother feel to it, The Factory taps into the zeitgeist, while remembering that some problems are perennial. ‘The current economic debate has given us ideas and we clearly poke fun at certain issues and challenge others,’ says Shorten. ‘But there are also many influences that are timeless and need to be constantly addressed.’

Zoo Southside, 662 6892, 3–25 Aug, 8.30pm, £10 (£7). Previews 1 & 2 Aug, £7.

This article is from 2008.

The Factory

  • 2 stars

Bristol-based company Precarious return with another uncompromising piece of cutting-edge dance. A little bit Big Brother, a little bit George Orwell,'The Factory' fuses physical theatre and multimedia work to take a timely look at contemporary consumerism. Unfortunately, it comes across as earnest, too long and pompous.

The Factory (Previews)

  • 2 stars

Bristol-based company Precarious return with another uncompromising piece of cutting-edge dance. A little bit Big Brother, a little bit George Orwell,'The Factory' fuses physical theatre and multimedia work to take a timely look at contemporary consumerism.'Part of the Edinburgh Festival Fringe*

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