Maisie Adam: Vague (4 stars)

Maisie Adam: Vague

credit: Andy Hollingworth

Satisfying hour of solid mainstream comedy

Maisie Adam isn't here to dump controversial opinions all over the Fringe's head, but she might get huge amounts of flak for one assertion: millennials are the worst dancers. Risky stuff, for sure, but it's grounded in a solid theory and made flesh through a very amusing bit of physical comedy. Indeed, Adam (the reigning champion of So You Think You're Funny) has plenty weapons in her comedic armoury and a relaxed charm (even in the face of an intoxicatingly warm room) is uppermost among them.

Adam's USP, if you can call it that, is her epilepsy. Diagnosed at the age of 14 with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy, or JME for short (aficionados of grime might know where that joke is headed), the main indicator that a seizure was upon her were fluttering eyelids. Given her teenage status, this was put down by most observers as eye-rolling stroppiness. The amusing aspects of her condition get plenty mileage in the show, with the title coming from a comment by one medic that she should start to 'expect vague episodes'.

Once we've filed into her sauna, her enjoyable beginning is to thank the people who have given her certain emotional instabilities, delivered in the style of a lounge singer introducing the band. From here, Adam makes a quick dash around her material to fill us in on her biography. A tall Yorkshirewoman from a village called Pannal, she recalls a childhood of landlines and hand-me-downs; she has now relocated to the metropolitan hubbub of Brighton in order to follow her dreams.

Pitched somewhere between a very Fringe story of personal struggle and a satisfying hour of fine set-up and punchline comedy, Maisie Adam's Vague might not move the earth. But if you can stand the heat, get into her Wee Room.

Gilded Balloon Teviot, until 27 Aug, 4.30pm, £9 (£8).

Maisie Adam: Vague

  • 4 stars

Gilded Balloon by arrangement with PBJ Management presents 18 months ago, Maisie decided to try stand-up comedy. Within a year, she won the biggest stand-up comedy newcomer competition (becoming the fourth woman to have done so in its 30 years), opened for major comedians, and claimed a Best New Comedy nomination at…

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