Alfie Brown: Lunatic (4 stars)

Alfie Brown: Lunatic

credit: James Deacon

When flaws and frailties can be deliciously funny

Actions count, not words, insists Alfie Brown with his latest provocative Fringe hour. A shame, then, that he is so good with language and imagery, but thankfully he is able to get those words into the public realm by taking total command of his stage. Brown's style remains a potent mix of cheeky scamp and verbose preacher as he rails against the kind of 'performative dads' he meets in the park while acknowledging his own parental failings. A 'horrible honesty', he proposes, is way better than those pious soundbites we all make in order to be on the right side of the debate.

And a large bulk of Lunatic has him laying out plenty horrible stuff. The heart of his hour revolves around a man who collapsed nearby while Brown was impatiently waiting for a bus to get him to a gig he was already running late for. He may have stood inert while others around him exploded into action, but is this unfolding drama the kind of sight he needs to witness to put his own troubles into some sort of perspective?

This is just another bold hour of stand-up from Alfie Brown which dares to delve into the darkness and consider what it is that makes us human.

Monkey Barrel, until 26 Aug (not 13), 9.30pm, £7 in advance or donations at the venue.

Alfie Brown: Lunatic

  • 4 stars

IAM Present Alfie Brown is charming and disgusting. His new show is about identity politics, trying to be a good father in a horrible world and being responsibly horny in the wake of wide-spread male sex crimes. He provides no answers, only questions. Society's new-found fondness for moral certainty is the subject of a…

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