White Mink (4 stars)

The swingingest joint in town

comments (1)

This article is from 2011.

White Mink

Fans of the swingtastic Vegas! club nights have long been aware that the best parties in the world all took place before the 60s started, daddio. Unfortunately, aside from sporadic events such as The Gatsby Club and Vegas’s own semi-regular outings, the flappers and dapper gents among us are ill-catered for. Thank heavens then for White Mink, taking place every weekend of the Fringe at the classy, sassy Voodoo Rooms.

This particular brand of speakeasy has a modern twist on it though – all the tunes fall into a broad category of ‘electro-swing’, meaning there’s a bit more oomph behind the bass and the tempo is kept snappy. The 21st century element is emphasised by the evening’s live act, Le KKC Orchestra, who mix their French grooves with hip hop beats and vocals.

White Mink creator Nick Hollywood is based down in Brighton, meaning those seaside cats get to dance the Charleston on a much more regular basis. It’s such a riotous night out that it can’t help but become more widespread in the future; in the meantime, get yourself along to The Voodoo Rooms while the Fringe still swings.

The Voodoo Rooms, 226 0000, 25–27 Aug, 12.15am, £10.

This article is from 2011.

White Mink

  • 4 stars

'Electro Swing Speakeasy' is the hugely influential new nightclub experience that has taken the sounds and styles of the 1920s and 30s, turned them on their head and smuggled them into the 21st century. Mixing a changing roster of the best live bands, DJs and cabaret from this evolving new scene with jazz-age black and…

Comments

1. Bea Fitz30 Aug 2011, 1:07am

What a shame Niki Boyle has not checked her facts - Miss Fitz-Poste's Modern Mixers (modernmixers.co.uk) have been running regular vintage-themed tea dance events for the birght young things of Edinburgh and central Scotland for 2 years now. We've developed a committed audience of burlesque and cabaret fans, swing dancers and hipsters from students to septuagenarians, despite a distinct lack of coverage from publications such as The List. Typical that it takes an event imported from Brighton to catch your attention whilst what is right under your nose goes unnoticed.

Cancel
RSS feed of these comments